Category Archives: Bulletin Articles

Words of wisdom from our weekly bulletin

“Languages”

A few years ago the English language was said to have 600,000 words and since that time it has no doubt gained many more.  This is probably because it has always been fluid enough to absorb words from many other cultures and is constantly inculcating new words and idioms.  Surely no one could memorize, understand and explain all those words and their nuances. Continue reading

“Distancing”

The ironic thing about social distancing is that it exacerbates the already social aloofness of a culture self-absorbed in its phones and other devices.  Medical experts warn us to stay at least six feet away from other people to prevent the spread of coronavirus.  Self-isolation must be much harder on the friendly extrovert than the shy introvert.  In the near riot competition to get disinfectant and toilet paper, some people totally ignore the six foot rule.  With tongue in cheek, my daughter suggested Continue reading

“Culling”

In the corn and milo fields of Western Kansas where I was born, the grain needs to be cleared of trash weeds before harvest time.  This process is called rouging, and the farmers there often hire teens from the towns to cut off the seed pods of the weeds and remove them from the fields. It is hot and tiring work but helps rid the field of future weeds. Continue reading

“Peacemakers”

There are many types of peace, three of them might be—enforced, negotiated and voluntary. The dictionary definitions of peace often include the idea of absence or freedom from war, conflicts, hostilities, annoyances and anxieties. It is called a state of tranquility, order and security. In the secular realm some types of peace are: Global, National, Local, Vocational, Marital and Familial. Peacemakers in these areas should be: Statesmen, Negotiators, Soldiers, Policemen, Judges, Bosses, Teachers and Parents.

In general the majority of people obey the laws and authorities to avoid Continue reading

“Humility”

A very old song has this line, “I know a little bit about a lot of things, but I don’t know enough about you.”  Admitting that one doesn’t know everything about everything is a good start to humility.  Someone once said, “I know just enough to know I don’t know much.”  That is another step on the road to humility.  Continue reading