Category Archives: Bulletin Articles

Words of wisdom from our weekly bulletin

“Blessings”

The hymn we often sing, WHEN UPON LIFE’S BILLOWS, contains the line, “count your many blessings.” It has a nice tune and a great message. However, the part that says, “ name them one by one,” is very hard to do. When I have insomnia I try but fail to even come close. I usually just try to lump them into categories such as: Family, Possessions, Opportunities, Brethren, Freedom, etc, etc. Continue reading

“Rafting”

His voice was dogmatic and harsh as he yelled at us over the roaring rapids. “Paddle left, paddle right, back paddle.” We did not resent his tone, in fact, we appreciated the guide’s demands because we had put our health and possibly even our lives in his hands. He had been through these boiling rapids many times and knew where the treacherous areas were. He had the trust of the rafting company to navigate through the dangerous boulders and tree trunks and return the raft and the passengers unharmed. Continue reading

“Remembrance”

My father-in-law, Bob, passed away several years ago at age 58—way too young! Every once in awhile my wife and I are startled to see a man with a full-head of white hair, square jaw and good posture and wearing the same type of glasses as Bob did. It is an eerie sense of déjà vu and given a fog and a little more distance… When we see a “double” we soon realize that the voice and mannerisms are very different. Continue reading

“Discrimination”

There will probably always be much debate and controversy when discussing the term discrimination. This may be due to the dual meaning of the word. The first dictionary definition is: The action or policies based on prejudice or partiality (towards people). The second is: The power of making fine distinction (discriminating judgment). Depending upon which definition we use, there must be an acceptable as well as an unacceptable time to discriminate. Continue reading

“Walls”

Throughout history mankind has built walls for various purposes—boundaries, protection, ideology, sovereignty and status. Ironically, few have accomplished their designated purpose. Not only do they keep people out but also keep them in, as in embassy walls that offer asylum and prison walls that house criminals. Some walls are huge and cover vast territories like the Great Wall of China which was built to protect their northern area from raids by nomadic groups and the Maginot Line which the French built in the 1930s to Continue reading